Faculty Details

Photo of Denise M. Rousseau

Denise M. Rousseau

University Professor, Carnegie Mellon University; H.J. Heinz II Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy, Heinz College and Tepper School of Business

Full-time Faculty

Voice: 412 2688470
Email: rousseau@andrew.cmu.edu
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Biography

Denise M. Rousseau is the H.J. Heinz II University Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University's H. John Heinz III College and the Tepper School of Business. She is the faculty director of the Institute for Social Enterprise and Innovation and chair of Health Care Policy and Management program. She was the 2004-2005 President of the Academy of Management and the 1998-2007 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Organizational Behavior. Rousseau received her A.B., M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley with degrees in psychology and anthropology. She has served on panels for the Institute of Medicine, National Science Foundation and the National Institute for Education. Currently she serves on the editorial boards of five scholarly journals. She was previously on the faculty of Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, the University of Michigan's Department of Psychology and Institute for Social Research, and the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Leeds (UK), Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), Chulalongkorn University (Thailand), and Renmin University (China). She has been an International Visiting Fellow of the Advanced Institute of Management (UK), Dublin City University's School of Business (Ireland) and the University of Cardiff Business School (Wales). Rousseau founded the Evidence-Based Management Collaborative, a network of scholars, consultants, and practicing managers to promote evidence-informed organizational practices and decision making.

Two-time winner of the Academy of Management's George Terry Award for best management book, Rousseau’s her most recent book, I-Deals: Idiosyncratic Deals Workers Bargain for Themselves, won the Terry Award in 2006. Psychological Contracts in Organizations: Understanding Written and Unwritten Agreement won in 1996.  Another book, Boundaryless Careers: A New Employment Principle for a New Organizational Era was a 1997 Terry Book Award finalist. Rousseau is an elected Fellow in the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology, the American Psychological Association, the Academy of Management, and the British Academy of Management. Her research received the first annual National Institute for Health Care Management Research Award (1994); the Organizational Behavior Division, Academy of Management, Best Paper Award (2004); the Organizational Psychology track, British Academy of Management, Best Paper Award (2006); and the William J. Davis Memorial Award, Educational Administration Quarterly Best Article Award (1982). In 2009, she received the Lifetime Career Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management. Rousseau has also received Distinguished Scholar Awards from the Western Academy of Management and the Managerial and Organizational Cognition Division of AOM. In 2013 she received an honorary doctorate from the Athens University of Economics and Business.

Rousseau's research focuses upon the impact workers have on the employment relationship and the firms that employ them. It informs critical concerns such as worker well-being and career development, organizational effectiveness, the management of change, firm ownership and governance, and industrial relations. Recognized in particular for developing the theory of the psychological contract, (Great Minds in Management, Oxford University Press, edited by Ken Smith and Michael Hitt), her work addresses the powerful reach individual employee's understanding of the employment relationship has on work groups, firms, and society.

Her publications include over a dozen books and 160 articles and monographs in management and psychology journals including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Executive, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organizational Science, Human Relations, Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational and Occupational Psychology, and Journal of Vocational Behavior.

Her teaching translates organizational research into evidence-based, positive professional practices benefiting firms, workers, and other stakeholders. Courses focus on performance management, strategic human resource practices, and managing change all from an evidence-based perspective, and are designed to build the learner's professional expertise and translate evidence-based concepts into effective action.

Rousseau is an advisor to numerous social enterprises, professional associations, governmental and for-profit organizations.

Selected Publications

Rousseau, D. M., Sitkin, S. B., Burt, R., and Camerer, C. Not so different after all: A cross-disciplinary view of trust. Academy of Management Review, 1998, 23, 1-12.

Rousseau, D. M. and Shperling, Z. Pieces of the action: Ownership and the changing employment relationship, Academy of Management Review, 2003, 28, 115-134.

Rousseau, D.M. Psychological contracts in the workplace: Understanding the ties that motivate. Academy of Management Executive, 2004, 18, 120-127.

Goodman, P.S. and Rousseau, D.M., Organizational change that produces results: The linkage approach. Academy of Management Executive, 2004, 18 (October), 7-21.

Rousseau, D.M, Ho. V. T. and Greenberg, G. Idiosyncratic deals: Theoretical implications of workers bargaining as individuals. Academy of Management Review, 2006, 31: in press.

Rousseau, D.M. Is there such a thing as evidence-based management? Academy of Management Review, 2006, 31, 256-269. (2005 Presidential Address)

Rousseau, D.M. & McCarthy, S. Evidence-based Management: Educating managers from an evidence-based perspective. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 2007, 32: in press.

Rousseau, D.M. Changing the deal while keeping the people. Academy of Management Executive, 1996, 10, 50-59.

Research Interests


Evidence-based Management, Human Resource Management, Changing Employment Relations, Organizational Change, Multi-level Organizational Models

Education


PhD, Psychology, University of California at Berkeley

Working Papers


Pieces of the Action: Ownership and the Changing Employment Relationship

This essay develops and links two models of ownership: first a composition model of the dimensions comprising ownership in firms, and a content model specifying the societal, firm, and individual factors that give rise to workers’ motivation to participate in ownership and employers’ motivation to share ownership. Ownership comprises financial participation, including control over residual assets, access to marginal revenues, participation in decision making, and access to financial information; along with sociopsychological factors including social standing, social responsibility, and psychological ownership. Firm ownership, across financial and sociopsychological facets, is increasingly parcelled out among financial investors, managers and workers. This new distribution of ownership is particularly characteristic of high technology and start up firms, due to the mobility of highly skilled workers, and their consequent power in the employment relationship. We specify how societal factors, firm characteristics, and worker qualities impact the motivation to own and the motivation to share ownership. By focusing on the shifting power balance of highly mobile workers, this treatment of emerging ownership practices provides a theoretical basis for understanding the employment relationship in start ups and high technological firms.

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Building Relationships Around Tasks: Psychological Contracts in Faculty-Doctoral Student Collaborations

Psychological contracts theory is applied to the study of faculty-doctoral student collaborations. Through a survey of 170 doctoral students, four types of psychological contracts are investigated. The quality of collaboration and frequency of meetings are found to differ significantly across these contract types. In addition, quality of collaboration and meeting frequency varied significantly across collaborations using different research methods (e.g, laboratory work, theory building) and disciplinary paradigms (i.e., high and low consensus). A comparison sample of 46 faculty from the same departments supported several trends observed in the doctoral student data.