• Police, Violence, and Data 

    The BlackLivesMatter Movement


    Professor Daniel Nagin is the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Stockholm Prize on Criminology, an elected fellow of the American Society of Criminology, and the Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics. His research focuses on the evolution of criminal and antisocial behaviors over the life course the deterrent effect of criminal and non-criminal penalties on illegal behaviors, and the development of statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data

    In the wake of recent incidences of lethal violence involving law enforcement officials in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas, we sat down with Nagin to talk to him about what factors led to these events, why there is apparent mistrust between citizens and law enforcement officials, and what policy, research, and training measures can be taken to help prevent these situations in the future. 

    Q. Based on your research, are the events in recent years and weeks that have led to the growth of the Black Lives Matter movement reflective a small number of outlying incidents, or is it symptomatic of a systemic problem?

    The Black Lives Matter Movement has to be understood in the context of the historical legacy of the ill treatment of blacks by the police and the criminal justice system and American political and social institutions more generally. That legacy is a fact. The Movement, I think, is a reflection of and reaction to that legacy. I don’t think people should be surprised by it, and it’s part of why people should listen to the Black Lives Matter position...]]>

    Police, Violence, and Data The BlackLivesMatter Movement

    Professor Daniel Nagin is the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Stockholm Prize on Criminology, an elected fellow of the American Society of Criminology, and the Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics. His research focuses on the evolution of criminal and antisocial behaviors over the life course the deterrent effect of criminal and non-criminal penalties on illegal behaviors, and the development of statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data

    In the wake of recent incidences of lethal violence involving law enforcement officials in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas, we sat down with Nagin to talk to him about what factors led to these events, why there is apparent mistrust between citizens and law enforcement officials, and what policy, research, and training measures can be taken to help prevent these situations in the future. 

    Q. Based on your research, are the events in recent years and weeks that have led to the growth of the Black Lives Matter movement reflective a small number of outlying incidents, or is it symptomatic of a systemic problem?

    The Black Lives Matter Movement has to be understood in the context of the historical legacy of the ill treatment of blacks by the police and the criminal justice system and American political and social institutions more generally. That legacy is a fact. The Movement, I think, is a reflection of and reaction to that legacy. I don’t think people should be surprised by it, and it’s part of why people should listen... ]]>

  • CMU's Heinz College Named 

    Top Analytics Program by INFORMS


    Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College has been awarded the prestigious UPS George D. Smith Prize by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research in Orlando.

    “INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,” said Melissa Moore, INFORMS executive director. “The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.”

    “We are proud of the work this year’s INFORMS George D. Smith Prize recipient, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, is doing to develop the next generation of operations research and analytics practitioners,” said Chuck Holland, UPS vice president of engineering. “At a time when world leaders are struggling to find answers to complex problems – global trade, emerging markets, poverty, and hunger among many others, Operations Research is a discipline they should turn to for solutions. These O.R. and analytics students are the key to a better future. We congratulate the Heinz College for winning the 2016 UPS George D. Sm...]]>

    CMU's Heinz College Named Top Analytics Program by INFORMS

    Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College has been awarded the prestigious UPS George D. Smith Prize by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research in Orlando.

    “INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,” said Melissa Moore, INFORMS executive director. “The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.”

    “We are proud of the work this year’s INFORMS George D. Smith Prize recipient, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, is doing to develop the next generation of operations research and analytics practitioners,” said Chuck Holland, UPS vice president of engineering. “At a time when world leaders are struggling to find answers to complex problems – global trade, emerging markets, poverty, and hunger among many others, Operations Research is a discipline they should turn to for solutions. These O.R. and analytics students are the key to a better future. We congratulate the Heinz College fo... ]]>

  • Honoring Al Blumstein's 

    Contributions to Public Policy


    Starting April 1, H. John Heinz III College will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein’s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research.

    Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.

    “Al has never felt constrained to approach things the way conventional wisdom dictates,” said Daniel Nagin, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, a 2014 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and Blumstein’s former Ph.D. advisee. “He’s always done things on his own terms, looking beyond standard ways of thinking about social problems, which is something I greatly admire him for.”

    Al Blumstein SmilingIn the 1960s and 70s, that meant pioneering the use of mathematical models as tools for studying crime, innovating an area of study that, up until that point, had been firmly rooted in sociology. By approaching criminology in a way that reflected his background in engineering and operations research, Blumstein was able to bring to the field an unpre...]]>

    Honoring Al Blumstein's Contributions to Public Policy

    Starting April 1, H. John Heinz III College will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein’s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research.

    Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.

    “Al has never felt constrained to approach things the way conventional wisdom dictates,” said Daniel Nagin, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, a 2014 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and Blumstein’s former Ph.D. advisee. “He’s always done things on his own terms, looking beyond standard ways of thinking about social problems, which is something I greatly admire him for.”

    Al Blumstein SmilingIn the 1960s and 70s, that meant pioneering the use of mathematical models as tools for studying crime, innovating an area of study that, up until that point, had been firmly rooted in sociology. By approaching criminology in a way that reflected his background in engineering and operations research, Blumstein was ... ]]>

  • South Australian Premier's 

    Historic CMU Visit


    This story was originally published on the CMU Australia website. It is modified and republished with permission.

    The Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU’s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier’s honor at the President’s residence.

    During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited H. John Heinz III College. During the Premier’s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU’s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU’s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.

    Dean Ramayya Krishnan of Heinz College and Dean Jim Garrett of the College of Engineering gave the Premier an overview of CMU’s role in the promotion of smart cities through the MetroLab Network

    South Australian Premier's Historic CMU Visit

    This story was originally published on the CMU Australia website. It is modified and republished with permission.

    The Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU’s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier’s honor at the President’s residence.

    During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited H. John Heinz III College. During the Premier’s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU’s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU’s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.

    Dean Ramayya Krishnan of Heinz College and Dean Jim Garrett of the College of Engineering gave the Premier an overview of CMU’s role in the promotion of smart cities through the